H.R. 1146 - The American Sovereignty Restoration Act of 2001

      
Summary

The Charter of the United Nations is neither politically nor legally binding upon the United States of America or the American people.

The Charter of the United Nations is commonly assumed to be a treaty.  It is not.  Instead, the Charter of the United Nations is a constitution.  As such, it is illegitimate, having created a supranational government, deriving its powers not from the consent of the governed (the people of the United States and peoples of other member nations) but from the consent of the peoples' government officials who have no authority to bind either the American people nor any other nation's people to any terms of the Charter of the United Nations.

Even if the Charter of the United Nations were a properly-ratified treaty, it would still be constitutionally illegitimate and void because it transgressed the Constitution of the United States of America in three major respects:

     1.  It unconstitutionally delegates to the United Nations the U.S. Congress'   legislative power to initiate war and the U.S. president's executive power to conduct war;
     2.  It unconstitutionally transfers to the United Nations General Assembly the United States House of Representatives' exclusive power to originate revenue-raising measures; and, 
     3.  It unconstitutionally robs the 50 American states of powers reserved to them by the Tenth of Amendment of the Constitution of the United States of America.

H.R. 1146 - The American Sovereignty Restoration Act of 2001 is the only viable solution to the continued abuses of the United Nations.  The U.S. Congress can remedy its earlier unconstitutional action of embracing the Charter of the United Nations by enacting H.R. 1146.  The U.S. Congress, by passing H.R. 1146, and the U.S. president, by signing H.R. 1146, will heed the counsel of our first president, George Washington, when he advised his countrymen to "steer clear of permanent alliances with any portion of the foreign world," lest the nation's security and liberties be compromised by endless and overriding international commitments. 

 

Complete 19-Page Analysis of H.R. 1146 by Herbert W. Titus


 

Privacy Statement

2001  The Liberty Committee